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senator durbin was kind enough to quote and to reference are that in the united states, we have an enormous african community which can be strategically vital as american businesses seek to access these growing opportunities across the continent of africa. we also look to bolster support for agencies that finance u.s. commercial engagement overseas. our competitors, particularly the chinese, have a very different approach to finance and the united states need to better coordinate and align to enact legislation. the goal set in this legislation is a 200% increase is an ambitious goal, a 200% increase in u.s. exports to africa in the necessary ten years. but if we were to accomplish this goal in a cost-effective way through more responsibly coordinating the investments we're already making in these federal agencies that can better coordinate u.s. private-sector efforts, think of how many jobs we might create, think of how many countries we might connect better to the united states, think of how many towns and workplaces across this country would been fit. senator durbin, i just wa
. and now the world is watching the united states senate. it is watching the senate to see whether democracy works. sounds simple, but it's true. will democracy work to reflect the majority of the united states of america, the majority of our people who say we need to do something about the guns? that is what the families said to me that day and in days since, and what people in connecticut and across the country have said to their senators, we must do something about gun violence. i remember talking talking to one of the families that evening and saying, you know, when you're ready, we ought to talk about what we can do to stop gun violence in measures in the united states congress, and she said to me, i'm ready now. the united states senate must be ready now to act. it must keep faith with those families and victims as the world watches, with benjamin andrew wheeler, age 6. his father, david, his is here today and he is here in spirit as we decide in the united states senate today whether we will move forward toward progress. ana grace marquez greene, also age 6, her mother melba is here t
the united states senate and the congress unanimously passed a measure to bolster mental health reporting requirements on background checks. some states like mine, texas, have received high marks for their compliance but many states have essentially been noncompliant and the department of justice has failed to adequately back up implementation of the law so essentially the law that we passed in the wake of the virginia tech shootings that require reporting of people that are judah kate at mentally ill in their respective states is not working the way it should. rather than just string along and ineffective program i think this is a wonderful opportunity for us to fix fix it and we shod fix fix it. i want to say just a word though about symbolism versus solutions. i am not interested in congress voting on a measure that would have no impact on the horrific violence we have seen in recent months. i am not interested in a symbolic gesture which would offer the families of the sandy hook shooting the old real solutions that they seek. to a person they told me they are not political, they don'
to the american people and to the united states senate through our wonderful chaplain, he basically said it all. we are still reeling from the senseless violence at the boston marathon yesterday. one thing, though, we are united and there's sympathy for the victims of this senseless attacks and the families who are suffering today. the victims. adding to the horror of this tragedy are the questions of who did this and why. the federal bureau of investigation, department of homeland security investigating this attack as aggressively as possible. as the president said last night, rest assured that the perpetrators will feel the full weight of justice for this terrible crime. on the anti-gun legislation before the senate, we're making good progress on the effort to schedule a series of votes to the amendments on the anti-gun legislation before the senate. i've had constructive conversations with my republican counterpart senator mcconnell. the american people deserve to know where we stand on these important antiviolence proposals. there are disagreements, mr. president, as to what we should do wi
not in committing themselves to at least engage in this debate on the floor of the united states senate. what about background checks on the second amendment? the gun lobby argues background checks are unconstitutional, given that justice scalia made it clear in the heller decision on the second and they said basically the second amendment is a personal right to bear arms, not the right of a militia, which it then argued for years. scalia said in that decision laws imposing qualifications on the sale of arms are presumptively lawful. there's no doubt at least in scalia's mind that a background check is consistent with the second amendment. the gun lobby also argues background checks are in effect is. you've heard this argument, how do you? all the law-abiding citizens who live by them, but the criminals won't. nearly 2 million prohibited purchasers have been blocked from buying a gun since background checks went into effect. there is so careless they try to buy a gun anyway. the argument that is why are there so many gun crimes committed? well, because they get done through other means, which is an
the united states senate, and we will be held accountable for what happens here. history is watching. let us be on the right side of history. thank you, madam president, and i yield the floor. a senator: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from new jersey. mr. menendez: madam president, i rise as a parent, as a father, as an american who saw the horror of newtown. too many times, i have come to this senate floor to say i offer my thoughts and prayers to the parents and victims of a assault weapon attack, too many times, too many times. columbine, aurora, virginia tech, newtown, how many times will we have to offer our thoughts and prayers to the victims of gun violence? i have two beautiful children, alicia and rob. they are the most important and cherished things in my life. i don't know what i would do if anything happened to either one of them. so i'm here for them and for the children they may have one day and for every child in newtown and across america whose small voice has been silenced by a gun. i don't think it's an exaggeration to say that each and every member of
and the united states senate for a reason. we decided to run for this high office because of issues we deeply care about whether it be more affordable health care or better housing or lower taxes and in a job like this you are driven to find the issues that move you. and then sometimes there are issues that find you. when i was elected to the united states senate last november i never imagined that my main speech would be about guns or about gun violence. just like i could have never imagined that i would be standing here in the wake of 20 little kids having died at sandy hook or six adults who protected them. but sometimes issues find you and so here i am. i'm so pleased to have the majority leader and the majority whip and so many of my colleagues on the floor with me here today. i want to start though with the unpleasant part. i think it's important for all of my colleagues to understand why we are having this debate this weekend next week about gun violence and why in the first time in decades we were able to break the logjam. it's easy to avert your eyes and what happened in newtown. it'
't able to get this done. despite the fact that a strong majority of the united states senate voted in favor of stronger background checks -- a strong majority -- republicans once again filtered -- pardon me -- filibustered a commonsense proposal. madam president, we were able to get four republicans -- 4 out of 45. yesterday president obama said it was a shameful day for the senate, and it probably was. i agree. but we should make no mistake, this debate is not over. in fact, this fight is just beginning. i've spoken with the president. he and i agree that the best way to keep working towards passing a background check bill is to hit a pause and freeze the background check bill where it is. in the meantime we'll keep moving forward with the people from aurora, colorado; blacksburg, virginia; newtown and other places to make sure that we are able to get something done. thil allow senators to keep negotiating. mr. president -- i'm sorry. madam president, we had nine amendments yesterday. they were not easy to vote on, not for us or for the republicans, and i understand that. but it w
. president, because it does say that we do our jobs here that we seek the united states senate for a reason. we decided to run for this high office because of issues we deeply care about, whether it be more affordable health care, better housing. in a job like this come you're driven to frame the issues that review. and sometimes there are issues that find you. when i was elected to the united states senate last november, i never imagined my name beachwood e. about god or about gun violence. just like i could never imagined he would be standing here in the wake of 20 little kids having died in cindy had her of those who protect them. sometimes issues fine you. so here i am. i'm so pleased with the majority leader and majority whip in so many colleagues on the floor with me here today. i want to start with the unpleasant part. it is important for my colleagues to understand why we're having this debate to speak at next week about gun violence in life for the first time we were able to break the logjam and do some things about how it's easy to avert your eyes from the horror of what happened
, it goes without saying that we all do our jobs here, that we seek a seat in the united states senate for a reason. we decided to run for this high office because of issues that we deeply care about whether it be more affordable health care or better housing or lower taxes. in a job like this, you're driven to find the issues that move you. and then sometimes there are issues that find you. when i was elected to the united states senate last november, i never imagined that my maiden speech would be about guns or about gun violence. just like i could have never imagined that i'd be standing here in the wake of 20 little kids having died in sandy hook or six adults who protected them. but sometimes issues find you. and so here i am. i'm so pleased to have the majority leader, the majority whip and so many of my colleagues on the floor with me here today. i want to start, though, with the unpleasant part. i think it's important for all of my colleagues to understand why we're having this debate this week and next week about gun violence. why for the first time in decades we were able to
, not only is harry reid a united states senator but also a a husband, a father, a grandfather and i hope friend of lots and lots of people, i choose to vote my conscience because, if tragedy strikes again, i'm sorry to say, mr. president, it will, if innocents are ung.a.o.d down in a classroom, theater or restaurant, i would have trouble living with myself aes a senator, as a husband, a fathers, or grandfather and friend, knowing that i didn't do everything in my power to prevent that incident. mr. mcconnell: mr. president? the presiding officer: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: last few days have been trying ones for our nation. monday's attack in boston reminded us that terrorism can still strike anywhere a at any time. and as yesterday's news of an attempt to send ricin to the capitol reminds you it is important as ever to take the steps necessary to protect americans from those who would do us harm. and this morning i'd like to recognize the postal and law enforcement officials for their excellent work in detecting and preventing this threat before it even reached the capitol. t
of eight is coming up with. we will be bringing forward in the united states senate as short of time as this evening. the president is supportive in the process we went through. and the president having been in the senate and seen this process before is very supportive. the president realizes that everybody didn't get what they wanted completely, but it's a product of comprise. we appreciate the president's support, and we believe that is important as we move forward with the process. the president also agrees that this is the beginning of a process not the end. that we will have a hearings and we will a amendment, we will have floor debate. i'm confident that at the end of the day we will have a bill to the president's desk. because all of players involved in the on board. every major player business or labor. that hasn't changed from the last time we tried in 2007. >> two more points, we hope to bring the bill tonight. we're working as we speak. that's very, very important. and one of the things we all agree with is there ought to be an open process. people who don't agree with off
states senator, but the idea that i can't get the information, you know, that i need to see the studies that you are doing. and again, i've got trust in the agency but with oversight of the agency. i just don't understand that. >> senator, the information that we have not been able to gather and share is information that is confidential. it relates to medical records and information that can trace back to specific people. and we are required to protect that as a scientist. having said that, if there's anything that we can do to build a more trust these him and on him and him and him and the redacted as far as coming in, the people in that sort of thing. again, you don't have a bunch of information that you shouldn't have dumped out that you know what you shouldn't have dumped out with peoples names and all this kind of stuff. again, we talk about transparency in business. i don't know that there's, in any other area of research, those things are taken care of word you redact, you do this and that, names, things like that. but the basic science, there's just no excuse. >> i am more than
themselves for a least in caging this debate on the floor of the united states senate. what about background checks? the gun large lobby argues it is unconstitutional even though justice scalia made it clear in the heller decision that said basically second amendment is a personal right to bear arms not the rights of the militia but laws imposing conditions and qualifications of the commercial sale of arms are lawful so there is no doubt in his mind that a background check is consistent with the second amendment and it also argues background checks are ineffective. you have heard this. pass all laws that you want and the law-abiding citizens to live by them but the criminals want. nearly 2 million prohibited purchasers have been blocked from buying a gun since back run checks went into effect so careless and stupid they tried anyway. they were stopped. why are there so many crimes committed? because they get the guns through another means through the ads in the newspaper that i mentioned revere and the argument that unless all lot is airtight we should not pass it will be used that standard
. good afternoon, everyone. welcome to the united states capitol. before we begin our program, all of you know about the tragedy in boston that took the lives of innocent americans and left many others in serious condition. so if you at all rise and join together in a moment of silence for the victims of this attack. thank you all. pursuant to house resolution 364, the house visitor center room 215 of the capitol visitor center has been designated to gabriel zimmerman meeting were. they are placing commemorative plaque that you all season. this meeting and is dedicated in memory of gabe zimmerman who was shot and killed serving the people of arizona, while carrying out his duties as an aide to representative gabby giffords. his dedication to community and to the democratic process inspires all of us to help each other as fellow human beings and as citizens of a caring nation. we are honored today to be joined soon by the vice president of the united states. we're especially grateful for the members of congress that are here. gabe's colleagues, friends, and loved ones who'v who have made y
to the floor of the united states senate without passing through security, but it doesn't get you into kelly middle school, nor should it. they have a simple, practical system. if you're visiting during school ours you buzz in and announce yourself. and then they decide whether that individual can enter through another set of locked doors. the double locks are a system that some schools are considering to implement. it's a sensible policy that is enabled by an intercom system and a camera. again, minimal costs compared to many other infrastructure programs that we may be considering this year. in middle town i visited snowe elementary school. principal james gudroe demonstrated how their doors are locked and when a person is buzzed in, video cameras record and archive who is entering. some schools have archiving systems, others do not. law enforcement knows that archiving is important, as chief william mckenna and mayor duran droot told me, these systems are planning that was undertaken even before sandy hook. school systems and boards and administrators and teachers were aware of security b
adjourned until that articulated the consensus in the united states and was very simple and very clear the purpose of the war and it is not to disrupt the social institutions of the self and everybody knew what that meant. it meant not to disrupt slavery. earlier today national intelligence director james clapper testified on automatic budget cuts and national security. he believes those cuts are making the u.s. less safe and he explained why during the hearing held by the senate armed services committee. it's a little more than two hours [inaudible conversations] >> good morning everybody. the committee meets this morning to hear from the director of national intelligence james clapper and lieutenant general, director of the defense intelligence agency spa capano current thfureat to the national securi. along with the national security agency, the national geospatial intelligence agency and the national reconnaissanceoffice and thinteencen etservices erts of the department of de that are also elements of the intelligence communy thatth direct clapper hits. director clapper while much
government, local units of getting, getting the senate involvement in it and that. so i'd like maybe you to reflect on and tell us things you think. i know, there's good operation. everybody has gotten your budget cut. you have gotten your budget cut. that means fewer people, you know, doing boater education on zebra mussel. you have fewer people talking about, you know, one problem we have incurred in the national forseeses. people fish along stream and used to dump the earthworms, you know, thinking this is good. they help the forest. i remember doing it as a kid. there wasn't any education, there wasn't any discussion about it. there was a research about what it meant when everybody was dumping their earthworms around trees. so do not! they don't in to -- [inaudible] [laughter] no. but if you could just kind of, you know, tell us a little bit about how, you know, maybe we have an endangered species legislation. maybe we need an invasive species legislation. maybe we need to talk about how we put all hands on deck both at the national, federal, local and community level on dealing with
'connell of california to be united states district judge for the central district of california. the presiding officer: under the previous order, there will be 30 minutes for debate equally divided in the usual form. mrs. boxer: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, in the midst of another tragic occurrence in our country where we are all holding our breath to learn the facts and praying, i wanted to say that the business of the senate is moving forward in terms of judges and how important it is to have judges in place so that criminals can be prosecuted and justice is served. and tonight in front of the senate is judge beverly reid o'connell to be district court judge for the central district court of california judge reid o'connell was approved in the judiciary committee by a voice vote. she has had a very diverse legal career. i want to say that she served as an exemplary superior court judge in los angeles. she will be an excellent addition to the federal bench. she is a lifelong southern californian. she grew up in northridge where she was v
of congress that was passed in 1986 by then a senator of arkansas designed to protect the caught in the united states that protect u.s. taxpayers' money and other countries' industries. you know, u.s. aid could have gone to the white house to get a waiver but nobody wanted to take it on so you have legions of the farmers say we want help growing this. american bureaucrats say sorry we will help you with this. >> this is so much a part of the history of afghanistan. as you know when he was referring to the great movie charlie wilson's war seeing it come right before my favorite scene which is when charlie wilson is talking to sitting on the balcony of the watergate hotel talking to the cia agent and this is a scene that is and in the book of the director added it is the lesson of the master which is a boy gets a horse and everyone in the village says it's wonderful he got a horse and than the master says we will see. then he falls down and smashes his leg and cripples him for ever and they see this is so horrible and he says we will see. then the war breaks out in afghanistan. and everyone is c
additional resources by the united states congress although we have the duty to implement the law. i have for 23rd team can use both a transfer authority, which is cacciatore and our budget as well as the nonrecurring expense fund for one time i.t. cost and its portion of funding for the prevention fund to use for outreach and education. you heard chairman described the level of concern and questions and states around the country and they want to make sure americans fully understand the benefits coming their way and decisions they can make. we have requested in the budget before you an additional 1.5 william dollars to fully implement the affordable care act. the mac federal medicaid spending as a percentage of the economy to the budget that will increase 25%, driven by the affordable care expansion is more than $4 trillion over the next decade and that's not the children for dollars state full text not medicaid. according to the national governors association, medicaid rep since the single largest portion of total state spending. this budget backs up the proposals for lower spending on m
arms from sources other than the united states? >> it has. that's reported in open source but it has. >> so the lack of arms has not been the decisive issue in terms of the conflict on ground in serious? >> not in my military judgment. there's no shortage of arms in syria. >> what is the problem? and perhaps is not as evident a year ago is, and i must say the surprising durability of assad, but also the continued incoherence of the opposition. is that a fair statement the? >> yes your. >> and our policy priority has been i think even back then and going forward for this year and going, continuing forward, is to try to build a coherent, inclusive opposition as the key strategic element in resolving this situation. is that a fair judgment? >> it is there, and it is even more important now with the coalescing of these extremist groups. so now you have got the moderate opposition becomes more important. >> and there's another aspect of this issue just at the level of conflict. that is, it's not simply supplying the opposition. it somehow interdicting support for the assad regime. the cha
. it is in the security interests of the united states to have been immigration reform. we cannot know how to protect america if we do not know who this here to fulfill the american dream versus who is here to do it harm. we have to get those in the shadow into the lake to have an opportunity to earn their citizenship and be part of the dream. and we know as does every american who is honest with themselves knows if you had fruit for breakfast this morning, it was probably picked in the hot sun by an immigrant worker with it went back and a sunburned head. [cheers and applause] we know if you had chicken for dinner last night it was early cut of the callous hand evan immigrant worker to provide you your dinner. we know that if someone in your family who needs care, can't take care, the chances are that it is an immigrant worker whose steady hand and warm heart is taking care of their daily necessities each and every day. [cheers and applause] we know some of the most successful high-tech come the nascent america were founded by an immigrant in the united states. these are people doing the jobs to bui
and now that every strategic plan i built over the years with the united states air force always was a plan. plans are always in contrast. a change. and so we have and will continue to improve upon a plan. >> was it developed to be aspirational or was it developed to give us an accurate blueprint of help va perceives? >> i think in all planning there is an aspect of aspiration at the beginning and then it is with assumptions and the availability of resources, it is adjusted for what we think is achievable. a long-term plan, like this one, with as much dynamics involved, we make an assumption, for example, that the flow of veterans out of uniform to the va is going to follow a pattern that we have been provided by the department of defense. if that changes that adjustment then we will have to look and see whether we can accommodate the change. if not we will have to say we have to resource. >> thank you very much. i look forward to sitting down with you to look at the matrix that brought about such a change in release three months. let me just say, i really wasn't addressing the i
, as i've indicated earlier, we got a significant majority of the united states senate voting to move forward on this background check. 90% of the democrats, which is in keeping with the american people, and four valiant republicans joined to put us where we are today. but the week didn't bring only bad news from the legislative front. a bipartisan group of eight of my senate colleagues -- would never have happened a few years ago but it is going to happen now. as i indicated, quoting senator schumer, background checks is about where immigration was just a few years ago. and a bipartisan group of eight of my senate colleagues -- four democrats and four republicans from all different political persuasions -- introduced a comprehensive plan to reform a broken immigration system. senators schumer, mccain, durbin, menendez, graham, bennett, rubio and flake have worked very, very hard on this legislation. and, mr. president, all one needs to do is look at the legislative pedigree of these eight senators. they are all over the book: liberal, conservative, moderate. and that's the way it sho
states senate that voted on the 1986 immigration bill. we thought that we did it right. we thought that by making it for the first time illegal for employers to hire undocumented workers and have a $10,000 fine if they did, it would take away the magnet that would bring people across the border so readily. obviously for a better life for them, obviously, who can you find people who have good spiritual values, good family values, good work ethics, wants to improve themselves. that's what america is all about. but entering the country illegally is not something that a country based upon the rule of law can tolerate. but anyway, we made it illegal in 1986. and then that fine, we didn't anticipate a whole industry of fraudulent documents. so if i go to an employer and i'm here unlawfully and i show him a passport that looks like it's the real thing, then, you know, they can't be fined $10,000 for hiring me. so we took away that magnet and we thought at the time, well, might as well legalize the three million people that are here and we did, based on a proposition we were fixing this th
. senator? >> thank you. thank you, governor and thank you, mr. mayor. the president of the united states has pledged his full support in all efforts both to keep the city safe and to find the person who did this and bring them to justice. we did not have to reach out to the president. the president reached out to us. he called the governor, he called the mayor, he called the members of the delegation because the president is actively involved here and responding. on behalf of our congressional delegation, senator cowan is here with me and congressman lynch and all of the members of our delegation we want to extend our thanks to the first-responders, to the firefighters, to the police officers to the ems, to everyone on scene including volunteers who came and helped those in trouble and helped save lives. we also want to thank those from all around the country and all around the world whose prayers and thoughts and offers of help have poured in we are deeply grateful. as the mayor says, boston will survive. >> thank you, governor. good morning my name is rick deslauriers. i'm the special
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27